ENGLISH
HRVATSKI
ART-e-FACT, STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE issue01: ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION [you are here] issue02: UTOPIA issue03: TECHNOMYTHOLOGIES issue04: GLOCALOGUE

ART WORK
STILL FROM FORTRESS EUROPE BY ZELIMIR ZILNIK
FILM
Fortress Europe
Želimir Žilnik
PASSPORT

Looking for a husband with an EU Passport
Tanja Ostojić
 
Fortress Europe
Želimir Žilnik
 
Passport
Andreja Kulunčić
 
WANTED
Ghazel
 
ART WORK
STILL FROM FORTRESS EUROPE BY ZELIMIR ZILNIK
FILM
Common Trip
Roman Ondak
JOURNEY

Two Journeys
Margarethe Makovec & Anton Lederer
 
Common Trip
Roman Ondak
 
Nothing Happens Accidentally
Aleksandar Battista Ilić
 
Border Crossing Services
Oliver Ressler & Martin Kren
 
Sing me a song ...
Maja Bajević
 

ART WORK
IMAGE OF THE CABANA BY PIA LINDMAN
PROPOSAL
The Cabana
Pia Lindman
IN-BETWEEN

The CaBana
Pia Lindman
 
Pairings
Grady Gerbracht
 
From an in-between place
Nedko Solakov
 
Guilty Landscapes
Ron Sluik
 
S.O.S. Binary sequence
Dalibor Martinis
 

ART WORK
IMAGE OF NO MORE BAD NEWS BY IVANA KESER
POSTCARD
NO MORE BAD NEWS
Ivana Keser
POSTCARDS

View postcards
A series of postcards created by artists, printed and given away.

 

ART WORK
IMAGE OF MEETING POINT: A SEARCH BY TANJA DABO
PHOTOG.
Meeting point: a search
Tanja Dabo
NEIGHBOURS

Meeting point: a search
Tanja Dabo
 
Beqiri's
Love Shop

Sokol Beqiri
 
The Fear of Newcomers
Ivana Keser
 
Liberty
Nebojša Šerić Šoba
 
Balkan - Ich wohne in berlin
Jovan Balov
 

ART WORK
GO_HOME BY DANICA DAKIC AND SANDRA STERLE
ACTION
Go_home
Danica Dakić & Sandra Sterle
HOME

Go_HOME
Danica Dakic & Sandra Sterle
 
Profession: Refugee
Svebor Kranjc
 
Migrant Navigator
Darko Fritz
 
One's Own Body as the Only Safe Haven
Boris Cvjetanović
 









ART WORK
THEORY

Illegal Migrants and Late Capitalism



Migrants moving towards the richer countries of the West are being presented in the mainstream public awareness in two mutually exclusive ways: as a natural catastrophe or as something self-understandably "human".

The public opinion industry speaks and writes either about "streams, floods" and how to "contain" them; or it explains it in some commonsensical manner, that the poor would just like to pick up crumbs from the tables of the rich. The two stereotypes are often featured together; together or separately, they always drive towards the same conclusion: all this does not really concern us; but "Europe" will not like us if we do not catch these "illegals" and send them back. Fairy-tales about the ghosts from the Orient have lulled public opinion into a sleep dumb enough not to be disturbed by an "accident" that killed a man, not to be moved by the introduction of the "suspicion of the abuse of the right" into the law on asylum. Nobody seems to care about our having become the antemurale Christianitatis again, the dumping-ditch under the walls of civilisation. It seems, though, that the ideology and practice of the geopolitical watch-dog fittingly entwine the mechanisms of world-hegemony and devices of domestic domination. According to this ideology, the West is rich because it is civilised - and for the same reason it is always right. In former times, they claimed that the true and only God was on their side. Meanwhile, this God got lost in the intermundia of irrelevance and obtained the right to multiculturalism - but practices remained pretty much the same: only inequalities grew, as did dependence.

Misery and riches belong to the same world-system: many are poor because a few are rich.

Europeans are unnecessarily afraid that impoverished masses will come to take away their jobs. But if capital were capable of using their labour, it would have employed them long ago in their own countries - or would have brought them to Europe. As it did some four decades ago: at that time, during a period of expansion, Europe did import cheap, undemanding and obedient labour. Now, in times of low growth and stagnation, there are no big profits in production, nor is there much work available. At the same time, a technological revolution is under way, literally disqualifying large sections of the work force. For both of these reasons, most of the currently unemployed in Europe do not have a real chance of getting employment again, regardless of the threat of immigration. Cruel though it may sound, they are redundant - within the context of the capitalist economy, that is. In this respect, they share the predicament of that same humanity pressing against their/our borders.

While analysts agree that the world system is in crisis, their interpretations diverge. Immanuel Wallerstein holds that this is the final crisis of capitalism.

André Gunder Frank thinks that only a bicentenary crisis of the Asian economy is coming to its end, and so is, accordingly, the much mystified "rise of the West". According to Pierre-Noel Giraud, only an exceptional peculiarity of the twentieth century is withering away: while differences among world-regions were drastically growing during the twentieth century, internal differences within the rich regions have been dramatically reduced. In the future, he expects those countries with low wages and high technological capacity (India, China, South East Asia, Eastern Europe) to catch-up increasingly with the present rich, while internal differences in the rich countries will irresistibly start to grow again.

According to Giovanni Arrighi's theory, the capitalist system oscillates in cycles where material expansion alternates with financial expansion. Every cycle is marked by the hegemony of the world-power which is capable of establishing an alliance between the State and the capital. The cycle that is presently approaching its end was dominated by the US hegemony. The United States still has political and military supremacy, while the available capital has moved to East Asia. If the State and the capital, although dislocated, establish an alliance again, a new capitalist cycle is likely to begin. If this does not happen, then capitalism will come to its end. The new system will either be an empire without a market, or a market without an empire.

Presently, the US is trying to prolong its hegemony by means of political imperialism and militarism. Having no real capital capacity any more, the US is trying to save itself with a "regressive" pre-capitalist strategy of world-domination - the empire. Many commentators have been musing over the apparent paradoxical difference between Democrat Clinton and Republican Bush who no longer intends to play the role of the world policeman. There is no paradox if we recall the role the Democrats played in the escalation of the Vietnam War, and if we remember that it was a Republican who ended this war and normalised US relations with China. And there is no real difference either, since it is most likely that Bush will trigger a new arms-race which will paralyse Europe and delay the recovery of Russia.

We then come back to the initial question: Whence the servile policy of our local political classes? In most of the post-socialist countries, local political class seeks support for its rule in American imperialism. This is the way in which they adapted to the new situation brought about by the revolutionary turmoil of the eighties. This is also how they hindered the transformational processes of the epoch. "The master changes, the whip remains" is how Slovene writer Ivan Cankar defined the democratic process at the beginning of the past century. At the end of the century, during the transition-termidor, the whip was changed in order for the master to remain the same.

If the Schengen-border actually becomes the limes of the American empire, it will also become the tomb-stone of capitalism. For such an eventuality will make it possible to merge two revolutionary processes that have hitherto remained separated: the struggle against the American empire (the sixties) - and the struggle against political and repressive ("extra-economic") forms of domination (the eighties). The former, usually epitomised by the "sixties-revolution", but not limited to it, has been a worldwide struggle that brought independence to many peoples all over the world, and in which important emancipatory progress has been made in the US itself.

The latter, usually represented by the democratic and human-rights break-through of the eighties, evolved in Central-Eastern Europe and in the former Soviet Union: it succeeded in bringing down the Party-State regimes, but failed to carry on into the second phase and to achieve the articulation of political freedom with social justice.

In many countries, there has been a continuity between the two processes: in the sixties, the target was the American empire; in the eighties, it was the "extra-economic" form of domination. If the American empire finally assumes the manner of "extra-economic constraint", then it will become a unique target which will unite the two forms of the struggles in the past.




Also by this artist/Theorist:

POSTCARD
POSTCARD
Untitled
Rastko Močnik







REPORTS
MAP
IMAGE OF BODO KAPING
INTERVIEW
Interview with Bodo Kaping
OVERVIEW

Trafficking
Lovorka Marinović
A booming sex slavery trade --trafficking and the exploitation of women

Migration as a Global & Local Problem
Božena Katanec
Freedom, frustration, and the countries in-between

Interview with Bodo Kaping
Oliver Ressler & Martin Kren
Excerpt from the video "Border Crossing Services",


 WRITINGS
LOOKING FOR A HUSBAND WITH AN EU PASSPORT BY TANJA OSTOJIC
ONLINE
Looking for a husband with an EU passport
Tanja Ostojić
THEORY

PRISONERS OF A GLOBAL PARANOIA
Žarko Paić
Ježevo as a permanent twilight zone between borders, politics and ideas.

Thnking in Exile
Suzana Milevska
I live, I dwell means the same as I am... Philosophical ideas connecting ourselves and our living spaces.

Jezevo - a story without a happy ending
Marina Gržinić
Ježevo as the cordon sanitaire of Europe.

Illegal migrants and late capitalism
Rastko Močnik
Unprecedented global inequality -- the final crisis of Capitalism?