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HRVATSKI
ART-e-FACT, STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE issue01: ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION [you are here] issue02: UTOPIA issue03: TECHNOMYTHOLOGIES issue04: GLOCALOGUE

ART WORK
STILL FROM FORTRESS EUROPE BY ZELIMIR ZILNIK
FILM
Fortress Europe
Želimir Žilnik
PASSPORT

Looking for a husband with an EU Passport
Tanja Ostojić
 
Fortress Europe
Želimir Žilnik
 
Passport
Andreja Kulunčić
 
WANTED
Ghazel
 
ART WORK
STILL FROM FORTRESS EUROPE BY ZELIMIR ZILNIK
FILM
Common Trip
Roman Ondak
JOURNEY

Two Journeys
Margarethe Makovec & Anton Lederer
 
Common Trip
Roman Ondak
 
Nothing Happens Accidentally
Aleksandar Battista Ilić
 
Border Crossing Services
Oliver Ressler & Martin Kren
 
Sing me a song ...
Maja Bajević
 

ART WORK
IMAGE OF THE CABANA BY PIA LINDMAN
PROPOSAL
The Cabana
Pia Lindman
IN-BETWEEN

The CaBana
Pia Lindman
 
Pairings
Grady Gerbracht
 
From an in-between place
Nedko Solakov
 
Guilty Landscapes
Ron Sluik
 
S.O.S. Binary sequence
Dalibor Martinis
 

ART WORK
IMAGE OF NO MORE BAD NEWS BY IVANA KESER
POSTCARD
NO MORE BAD NEWS
Ivana Keser
POSTCARDS

View postcards
A series of postcards created by artists, printed and given away.

 

ART WORK
IMAGE OF MEETING POINT: A SEARCH BY TANJA DABO
PHOTOG.
Meeting point: a search
Tanja Dabo
NEIGHBOURS

Meeting point: a search
Tanja Dabo
 
Beqiri's
Love Shop

Sokol Beqiri
 
The Fear of Newcomers
Ivana Keser
 
Liberty
Nebojša Šerić Šoba
 
Balkan - Ich wohne in berlin
Jovan Balov
 

ART WORK
GO_HOME BY DANICA DAKIC AND SANDRA STERLE
ACTION
Go_home
Danica Dakić & Sandra Sterle
HOME

Go_HOME
Danica Dakic & Sandra Sterle
 
Profession: Refugee
Svebor Kranjc
 
Migrant Navigator
Darko Fritz
 
One's Own Body as the Only Safe Haven
Boris Cvjetanović
 









ART WORK
PASSPORT

Migration as a Global & Local Problem



The migration of people is not just a particularity of this region alone, or of this time. It seems that large numbers of migrants have always left their lands of origin or ethnic roots and migrated to other lands in search of better possibilities or searching for protection from persecution and violence. Statistics show that around 150 million people today live outside of the countries they were born in or the countries of their citizenship. A large number of these people are not even registered as international migrants as they live and work in these other countries illegally, sometimes permanently, and sometimes temporarily.

International migration has become a global phenomenon which includes not only a wide range of countries of origin, countries of transit and countries of final destination but various groups of migrants as well. A highly qualified worker in Singapore works in Australia, a refugee from Afghanistan works in Iran, a Nigerian woman is sold in Italy, an agricultural worker from Mexico now works in the US, a smuggled Chinese cooks in a restaurant in London, a non-registered Romanian works as a construction worker in Croatia. All these are examples of international migrants.

Today we can divide migration into two basic types:

1. Voluntary migration - including migration whose purposes: employment, education, joining of families or other personal reasons,
2. Forced migration - including migration which is the result of persecution, conflict, natural catastrophes, ecological contaminations or other situations which bring danger to people’s lives, human freedom or survival.


International migration is a complex problem and important factor of security for every country both economically and politically. A majority of countries today are a part of the global migration system where the migration politics of one country has an influence on another country so that managing this problem requires strong cooperation between various states.

Can the Republic of Croatia as an organic part of Europe be outside of the context of these global movements? It is quite clear that this is not possible. This at any rate is shown by the illustration of migration movements to and through Croatia. Namely, in the last twelve years, this region has registered both forms of migration movements, both voluntary and forced. Up to the termination of the war at the end of 1995 we were met almost exclusively with forced migrations of vast proportions. During 1992 over 800,000 refugees alone were noted in the Republic of Croatia but with the political stabilization of this part of Europe in the region of our Republic, along with the arrival of tourists, business people and other “desirable” migrants, we also began to keep records of those who entered illegally or who resided illegally in the area of our country. This is shown with the following figures:

Illegal crossings of the state border 1996-2001

1996 3,200
1997 8,303
1998 10,556
1999 12,340
2000 24,180
2001 17,038

However, even if the above-mentioned numbers point to an abruptly growing influx of illegal migrants, what is necessary to keep in mind is that a very small number either permanently or continuously remain in our country. The Republic of Croatia, as with other countries in transition, with its still insufficiently developed economy is not a country that is attractive enough for those people whose reasons for leaving their homes are to find better opportunities somewhere else. Therefore, our country is only a country on the way to one’s goal, or, in other words, a transit country.

But unfortunately, statistics show that from the entire mass of people who at all costs leave on their way to the “land of their dreams” only 30% ever reach their goal. A large number of people, considering that this concerns people who did not previously fulfill all conditions for entry into their target country, nor conditions for crossing through territories of transit countries, have been stopped at one stage of their journey and returned to the state from which they started out from. Or to the country from which they entered directly into the territory of the country in which they were discovered as illegal immigrants.

During the last six years almost 20,000 illegal immigrants have been returned for similar reasons or for failure to comply with regulations of the Republic of Croatia in the countries of departure or in neighbouring countries.
Of course, respecting international conventions, that is, the civilized rules of behaviour, the Croatian police has not in any case sent back people to countries in which their basic human rights would in any way be violated.

As this mostly concerns citizens of far-off lands who, especially as illegal immigrants, would be hard-pressed to find their own on such long journeys, they frequently become the victims of well-organized international smuggling rings to whom they pay enormous sums of compensation, sometimes they even invest all their assets and/or belongings hoping that this will bring them to their desired goal.

Smuggling people today is one of the most profitable “jobs” in the world and it is estimated that annual profits exceed $8 billion US.

The path of one female Chinese citizen through Baltic countries to the USA costs around $25,000. In this context it is enough to only mention that the portion of the journey through the Republic of Croatia alone “costs” around $1,000 per person. At the same time, this type of crime hardly registers in people’s minds as a serious punishable crime, and sometimes it is even viewed as “extending a hand of help” to those who are in grim circumstances.

The smuggling of people is also tied in with human trafficking, which is a punishable offence and which we can call, without any reservation, the modern-day reinstatement of slavery. Every illegal immigrant is very easy prey not only for the smuggler but for the human trafficker because he/she is usually a person without an identity, destined to hide before authorities of the country which he/she is traveling through or in which he/she wishes to live in permanently.

Today's Europe rests on three key points:
freedom, security and justice.


The first, the basic notion of Freedom implies freedom of movement, however, if we ask ourselves what freedom of movement means in the context we are talking about here we can see that that kind of freedom is not such a broad notion at all.

What it means is:
a) freedom of movement within the country in which a person has the right to reside or stay temporarily,
b) freedom to leave the country. However, no one has the right to enter the country of one’s desire, if his/her staying there has not been previously approved in some way.

Today’s developed countries, it seems, are considerably frustrated with this inconsistent interpretation of this aforementioned notion, but what is also clear is that this enticing word brings into quandary all those people who interpret this notion literally and who start out on their precarious journeys.


.








REPORTS
MAP
IMAGE OF BODO KAPING
INTERVIEW
Interview with Bodo Kaping
OVERVIEW

Trafficking
Lovorka Marinović
A booming sex slavery trade --trafficking and the exploitation of women

Migration as a Global & Local Problem
Božena Katanec
Freedom, frustration, and the countries in-between

Interview with Bodo Kaping
Oliver Ressler & Martin Kren
Excerpt from the video "Border Crossing Services",


 WRITINGS
LOOKING FOR A HUSBAND WITH AN EU PASSPORT BY TANJA OSTOJIC
ONLINE
Looking for a husband with an EU passport
Tanja Ostojić
THEORY

PRISONERS OF A GLOBAL PARANOIA
Žarko Paić
Ježevo as a permanent twilight zone between borders, politics and ideas.

Thnking in Exile
Suzana Milevska
I live, I dwell means the same as I am... Philosophical ideas connecting ourselves and our living spaces.

Jezevo - a story without a happy ending
Marina Gržinić
Ježevo as the cordon sanitaire of Europe.

Illegal migrants and late capitalism
Rastko Močnik
Unprecedented global inequality -- the final crisis of Capitalism?