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ART-e-FACT, STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE issue01: ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION [you are here] issue02: UTOPIA issue03: TECHNOMYTHOLOGIES issue04: GLOCALOGUE

ART WORK
GO_HOME BY DANICA DAKIC AND SANDRA STERLE
ACTION
Go_home
Danica Dakić & Sandra Sterle
HOME

Go_HOME
Danica Dakic & Sandra Sterle
 
Profession: Refugee
Svebor Kranjc
 
Migrant Navigator
Darko Fritz
 
One's Own Body as the Only Safe Haven
Boris Cvjetanović
 

ART WORK

 
 
IN-BETWEEN
 
 
 
 





ART WORK
HOME
WRITINGS
ONLINE
Go_home
Danica Dakic & Sandra Sterle

go_home
Danica Dakić & Sandra Sterle
http://project-go-home.com

View text on this work by Roxana Marcoci

NEW YORK DIARY (excerpt from)

11. 09. 01 First morning coffee. Dan and me still trying to introduce our new home to Adrian who seems to be nervous about changing so many environments in such a short time. After all he is just three months old. We have been with him to four different countries, on two continents. As we sit and talk in the kitchen, we hear a sound of a plane, which seems to be flying too low. The very next moment we hear the plane crushing into something. We are looking at each other in silence for a few seconds and Dan says: "This sounds like kamikaze!" We laugh... and think...it must be something else... Danica decides to go to Chinatown to get some groceries and fish for tonight. The phone rings. Dan picks up the horn. I have Adrian in my arms. It is Fritzie. She asks if everybody is ok? Yes, we say, why? She is explaining something to Dan and from the expression on his face I am starting to realize that whatever happened must be serious. Dan repeats her words to let me know: a plane crushed into the World Trade Center; One of the Towers is on fire. She is watching it from the roof of her building. We are very close. The tower might start to fall down.O, my god! O, my god...And than the same sound again. Fritzie is still on the phone. Probably she is running out of words for a moment, because nobody talks. She is just on the phone. I instinctively try to find a safe corner in the house. Dan asks Fritzie; are they planes or missiles? Are they planes? Fritzie says yes, they are both planes. Still, this must be an attack. Another plane crushed into the other tower. They are both on fire...The funny thing is that all this time I actually don't have any idea about where we are. We have just arrived and I don't have a clue about how far the World Trade Center is from where we are now. The only thing that we did yesterday was bringing our dirty laundry (mostly Adrian's) to the laundry around the corner. What now? What's next?


Sandra Sterle
Artist based in Split, Croatia and Amsterdam, Holland
sterle@myself.com


Danica Dakić
Artist based in Sarajevo, BiH and Dusseldorf, Germany
danicadakic@yahoo.com





Nothing is guaranteed, except contamination

A change in the practice and theory of art that occurred in the past few years reflects an intensified engagement with the outside world and the issues of our time -war and the eschatological dimension of terrorism, globalization and capital distribution, migration and cultural identity, transnational diasporic formations, and the reconceptualization of the term community. Attempting to broaden the focus on the social aspects of art’s production and reception, a number of artists and collectives have advanced distinct models for an art whose public strategies constitute a significant part of its aesthetic makeup. This reinscribed form of public art is discursive, premised on interactivity with the audience and among diverse social groups. The ensuing breakdown of restrictive definitions of art, artist, and spectatorship, subjectivity and communality has fostered the development of a critical dialogue that infiltrates and disturbs a dominant culture based on identity stereotypes and circumscribed notions of site. As such, this paradigm for public art sustains social awareness, a renewed urgency to act and take responsibility (Fritz Perls calls responsibility “response-ability,” the ability to respond), and collective authorship by factoring various constituencies into the construction of the work. As discussed by a number of cultural historians, to produce works engaged in social praxis, artists have become facilitators, fund-raisers, community educators, and logistical coordinators.

These issues, but also others pertaining to mobility, real and virtual nomadism, the decentering of the familiar concept of home, and the articulation of place as a discursive field of operation, inform the project go_Home, developed by the Croatian artist Sandra Sterle and Bosnian artist Danica Dakić from September to December 2001 as part of an ArtsLink residency in New York. This project, for which the two artists decided to relocate to New York and live together for a four month period, probes the elusive logic of belonging and the idea of a multiply located instead of a fixed community. The collaboration further involved the participation of guest artist and architect Marjetica Potrč from Slovenia, and actress Milica Tomić and theorist Branimir Stojanović from Serbia. In go_Home these artists from ex-Yugoslavia used the real space of their residence and the virtual home of the Internet (which served as a site for video and photographic experimentation, transatlantic texts, recipes, a calendar of events, and a chat room), to address both the dialectical relationship between home and elsewhere, and the porous concept of identity sensitive to multiple attachments. The project also included a number of live web cast seminars conceived as dinner gatherings to which local and international art professionals, architects, and representatives from immigrant service organizations were invited. In conjunction with go_Home Sterle also produced New York Diary, an online journal about her stay and experience in New York, partly fictional as evoked in the artist’s photographs documenting her walks through the streets of New York dressed as a cook, and partly real as captured in the flags waving in the aftermath of September 11. Merging reality and fantasy, patriotism and cinematic reenactment, actual dislocation and virtual relocation, Sterle exposed the instability of who one is, and by extension the instability of a fixed concept of home. Her diary, like the syncretic project go_Home, can thus be understood as a process of fostering links with more than one place at once, of inventing new geographical matrices, and -to paraphrase James Clifford once again- of desisting absolutist forms of citizenship.

Roxana_Marcoci@moma.org






REPORTS
MAP
IMAGE OF BODO KAPING
INTERVIEW
Interview with Bodo Kaping
OVERVIEW

Trafficking
Lovorka Marinović
A booming sex slavery trade --trafficking and the exploitation of women

Migration as a Global & Local Problem
Božena Katanec
Freedom, frustration, and the countries in-between

Interview with Bodo Kaping
Oliver Ressler & Martin Kren
Excerpt from the video "Border Crossing Services",


 WRITINGS
LOOKING FOR A HUSBAND WITH AN EU PASSPORT BY TANJA OSTOJIC
ONLINE
Looking for a husband with an EU passport
Tanja Ostojić
THEORY

PRISONERS OF A GLOBAL PARANOIA
Žarko Paić
Ježevo as a permanent twilight zone between borders, politics and ideas.

Thnking in Exile
Suzana Milevska
I live, I dwell means the same as I am... Philosophical ideas connecting ourselves and our living spaces.

Jezevo - a story without a happy ending
Marina Gržinić
Ježevo as the cordon sanitaire of Europe.

Illegal migrants and late capitalism
Rastko Močnik
Unprecedented global inequality -- the final crisis of Capitalism?