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ART-e-FACT, STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE issue01: ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION [you are here] issue02: UTOPIA issue03: TECHNOMYTHOLOGIES issue04: GLOCALOGUE

ART WORK
IMAGE OF THE CABANA BY PIA LINDMAN
PROPOSAL
The Cabana
Pia Lindman
IN-BETWEEN

The CaBana
Pia Lindman
 
Pairings
Grady Gerbracht
 
ALIEN
Candice Breitz
 
From an in-between place
Nedko Solakov
 
Guilty Landscapes
Ron Sluik
 
S.O.S. Binary sequence
Dalibor Martinis
 

ART WORK

 
 
IN-BETWEEN
 
 
 
 





ART WORK
IN-BETWEEN
ONLINE ONLINE ONLINE
Installation view
Goethe Institute, Zagreb, November 2003
photos: Marko Salopek and Ana Dana Beroš
  Installation detail


ALIEN
(Ten Songs from Beyond)
Candice Breitz

Alien is a series of ten short films, each of which is a strange hybrid of amateur Karaoke, tourist home video, science fiction and subtitled documentary. On entering the installation, the viewer finds herself in a dark room: from the shadowy center of the space, ten distinct voices can be heard singing a range of German songs. Heard simultaneously as they leak into the room from the ten monitors, the ten voices produce a Babylonian dissonance at the core of the space. The jarring polyphony that we experience here will be familiar to viewers who know earlier works by Breitz, and one is reminded in particular of the artist's Karaoke (2000).

As one navigates one's way amongst the rising and falling voices, one encounters a singing figure on each monitor. The singers perform their songs against a series of Berlin backdrops, ranging from the Russian Monument in Treptower Park, to Alexanderplatz in Mitte, to the Berlin Tiergarten. While each of the singers deliver a more or less enthusiastic performance of his or her song, it quickly becomes apparent that none of the singers perform with their own voices. In fact, the songs were performed first by ten natural German-speakers, in a recording studio, where Breitz asked each of them to give her their best a cappella rendition of one of the ten songs. Subsequently, ten 'new Germans' (people who have emigrated to Germany for various reasons and who do not have a natural relationship to Germany or to the German language) were given the same songs and asked to re-perform them in various Berlin settings. Once the video footage of the ten 'new German' singers had been collected, their voices and the soundtracks recorded during their shoots were completely erased from the footage, leaving a series of ten mute lip-syncing bodies, into which the voices of the ten natural German-speakers were then imported. Through a low-tech digital ventriloquism, the confident voices of ten native speakers of the language were thus transported into the bodies of ten immigrants, such that the foreigners are now literally inhabited by the language of their new home country, with somewhat disconcerting effect.

The cultural norms and values carried by popular songs may well be in contrast with the values of those foreigners who come to settle in a new homeland. This tension is explored as themes such as patriotism, nationalism and cultural heritage appear in the lyrics of the chosen songs, alongside reflections on home and belonging. While Alien resonates with foreign-ness, it is not ultimately clear what is foreign here: the immigrants themselves, the voices that occupy them, or the songs that bury themselves in shared cultural consciousness.

With figures like Berlusconi, Haider and Le Pen looming large in European headlines, Alien is particularly poignant: in many countries, the question of integration is closely tied to whether the immigrant is able to speak the official language of the new country. Alien explores the overlapping territories of language acquisition and cultural integration, alluding to the necessity of acquiring the language of one's chosen country of immigration, while implying the difficulties that are encountered as one colonizes and is colonized by a new language. The work engages the desire and urgency that the immigrant feels in relation to a new language, without losing sight of the frustrations that often characterize the immigrant's attempts to insert herself into a new language. Alien is less about Germany and the German language per se, than it is about the experience of entering into and being entered by a foreign language. Alien loudly asks, but then refuses to answer, the question of whether it is finally possible to feel at home in a tongue that is not one's own.

About project Alien:
http://www.rwe.com/generator.aspx/templateId=renderPage/id=3918


Candice Breitz
Artist based in Berlin, Germany






REPORTS
MAP
IMAGE OF BODO KAPING
INTERVIEW
Interview with Bodo Kaping
OVERVIEW

Trafficking
Lovorka Marinović
A booming sex slavery trade --trafficking and the exploitation of women

Migration as a Global & Local Problem
Božena Katanec
Freedom, frustration, and the countries in-between

Interview with Bodo Kaping
Oliver Ressler & Martin Kren
Excerpt from the video "Border Crossing Services",


 WRITINGS
LOOKING FOR A HUSBAND WITH AN EU PASSPORT BY TANJA OSTOJIC
ONLINE
Looking for a husband with an EU passport
Tanja Ostojić
THEORY

PRISONERS OF A GLOBAL PARANOIA
Žarko Paić
Ježevo as a permanent twilight zone between borders, politics and ideas.

Thnking in Exile
Suzana Milevska
I live, I dwell means the same as I am... Philosophical ideas connecting ourselves and our living spaces.

Jezevo - a story without a happy ending
Marina Gržinić
Ježevo as the cordon sanitaire of Europe.

Illegal migrants and late capitalism
Rastko Močnik
Unprecedented global inequality -- the final crisis of Capitalism?